The Art of Voting: Christie’s Empowers U.S. Citizens to Vote

Shreeya Maskey
Published on

On Tuesday, November 3rd, U.S. citizens had the opportunity to shape the future and elect their next president. To encourage every American to exercise their right to vote, Christie’s exhibited five works in a virtual show called The Art of Voting. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this event was held entirely online from October 22nd, 2020 through November 3rd.

“We want to do our part this voting season by utilizing our digital space to provide illustrated voting instructions that ensure correct, straightforward, and timely voting practices,” Christie’s wrote on their website.

Artists such as Robyn Blair Davidson, Jojo Anavim, Theo MiGHTY, KESH, and Ryan Bock collaborated with the auction house to employ the power of visual art. The presented works focused on getting out the vote.

Robyn Blair Davidson (B. 1986, Potomac, MD.), VOTE, 2020. Image from Christie’s.
Robyn Blair Davidson (B. 1986, Potomac, MD.), VOTE, 2020. Image from Christie’s.

Best known for her depictions of candy treats and everyday objects, Robyn Blair Davidson uses a whimsical style in her prints. Describing her vibrant works, she states that her candy selections and color choices are “intended to bring the viewer back to nostalgic happy times and to encourage them to look to the future with that same positive energy.” 

Her works are mainly based on humor and hope. Davidson’s Vote, for instance, was created to encourage voter participation and build a better future for all. The artist believes that democracy works better when everyone participates.

Jojo Anavim (B. 1985, New York), I Want YOU to Vote!, 2020.  Image from Christie’s.
Jojo Anavim (B. 1985, New York), I Want YOU to Vote!, 2020.  Image from Christie’s.

Jojo Anavim is an American contemporary artist who got his start with advertising campaigns and billboards for companies such as Sephora and W Hotels. Drawing inspiration from American commercial culture, his works combine vintage collage with Pop-style art. His artistic approach is similar to Andy Warhol’s style, which is why he is often known as the “Andy Warhol of the Snapchat generation.”

Theo MiGHTY (B. 1990, Queens, NY), No Room for the Panther, 2020. Image from Christie’s.
Theo MiGHTY (B. 1990, Queens, NY), No Room for the Panther, 2020. Image from Christie’s.

Theo MiGHTY’s affinity for contrasting light and dark tones can be seen in most of his works. The artist’s interest in Black American history also serves as a recurring subject for his oil paintings. This exhibition showcased MiGHTY’s No Room for the Panther, as well as works from illustrator KESH and contemporary painter Ryan Bock.

“With a longtime flagship saleroom in the heart of New York City at Rockefeller Center, our aim is to create an online hub and resource to clarify the voting process for New York voters and to make sure that their voices are heard,” Christie’s wrote. This engagement from a major auction house may set a precedent for elections to come.

Find continued coverage of the U.S. elections on Auction Daily.