Around the World With Nazmiyal Auctions’ Antique Rugs and Carpets Sale

James Ardis
Published on
Antique Persian Ivory Sarouk Farahan Carpet. Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.
Antique Persian Ivory Sarouk Farahan Carpet. Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.

International collectors were first introduced to Persian Sarouk Farahan carpets at the 1873 Vienna World’s Fair. Though designed for the Persian aristocracy, these pieces are known for their purposeful imperfections. No two flower petals are the same size on a Sarouk Farahan carpet or rug. The base color often changes from one side of the piece to the other, creating a vibrant juxtaposition. This January, a late-19th-century example of a Sarouk Farahan carpet will highlight Nazmiyal Auctions’ antique rugs and carpets sale.

The carpet on offer (estimate: USD 15,000 – $20,000) was produced in the 1890s. Decorating it are rose-petal-shaped figures that connect and flow into each other. Embellishments surround these figures, some of which form geometric patterns while others look more spontaneous. Beyond Sarouk Farahan carpets, many other Persian styles are represented in this sale, including Serapi and Halavi Bidjar. Readers can learn more about the available Persian antique carpets in Auction Daily’s preview of the event.

Vintage Swedish Kilim signed “MLB.” Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.
Vintage Swedish Kilim signed “MLB.” Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.

Nazmiyal Auctions’ antique rugs and carpets sale begins on January 21st, 2021, at 6:00 PM EST. It will feature pieces from around the world, including present-day Egypt, Sweden, Iran, and Turkey. Styles range from the densely-decorated Egyptian Cairene carpet to the utilitarian Swedish kilim rug.

Kilim rugs were not always highly valued in the market. Because they were originally made with functionality instead of aesthetics in mind, many disregarded kilim rugs as run-of-the-mill. However, collectors now appreciate their authenticity and the flat-weaving technique used to create them. This weaving method gives kilim rugs a texture unlike others in the category.

Vintage Swedish Kilim signed “AB MMF.” Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.
Vintage Swedish Kilim signed “AB MMF.” Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.

The Scandavanian people became familiar with kilim and other types of rugs from international traders. The style originated in Turkey, but the harsh winters made the Scandinavian people quick and enthusiastic adopters. They likely began making their own kilim rugs in the 12th century. Nazmiyal Auctions’ antique rugs and carpets sale will feature several contemporary examples. That includes a powder blue, green, and white Swedish kilim rug produced in the 1950s (estimate: $4,000 – $6,000). A plus-sign pattern runs down the middle of the rug, framed by an interconnected zig-zag design.

16th-Century Egyptian Cairene Carpet. Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.
16th-Century Egyptian Cairene Carpet. Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.

Collectors who want to venture much farther back than the 1950s will find a 16th-century Egyptian Cairene carpet (estimate: $30,000 – $50,000). The piece’s densely-packed decoration is still visible. Interrupting the repeating design is a pale circle in the middle and four quarter circles in each corner. 

Cairene carpets became popular during the Mamlūk Sultanate, a dynasty that once spanned from present-day Egypt to Iraq. This carpet style is highly regarded for its clusters of geometric forms, with common patterns including stars and octagons. 

Other highlights from Nazmiyal’s January sale include carpets from the Native American Navajo Tribe and examples from across the Caucasus and Central Asia. Interested bidders can view the entire auction catalog on Bidsquare.

Large Antique American Navajo Carpet. Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.
Large Antique American Navajo Carpet. Photo courtesy of Nazmiyal Auctions.

Want to learn more about Nazmiyal Auctions, including their latest events, featured lots, and press releases? Visit Nazmiyal Auctions’ news channel page.